Tutorials — Michael Clark

In the last Workflow Friday blog post we covered the Profile and Color sections of the Lens Corrections panel in Lightroom’s Develop module. Here, in this second Lens Corrections blog post, we will discuss the Basic and Manual sections of the Lens Corrections panel. Let’s start out with the Basic section. LENS CORRECTIONS PANEL - THE BASIC PANEL Here is...
The Lens Corrections panel in the right panel of the Develop module has been updated yet again in Lightroom Version 5. The Adobe engineers, always looking for a way to improve image quality in the raw processing stage, were listening to feedback and they have come up with a very handy and simple to use set of tools to correct...
It used to be that a third party noise reduction software like Noise Ninja was necessary to lessen noise in photos. However, once Lightroom’s noise reduction capabilities were updated in Version 3 and are still on par with Lightroom Version 5, Lightroom can effectively diminish noise in photos as good as Noise Ninja or any other third party noise reduction...
As an aside from our main workflow, before we discuss the Detail Panel in Lightroom’s Develop module, let’s discuss the basics of a Lightroom Sharpening workflow. A sharpening workflow generally consists of three different types of image sharpening: capture sharpening, creative sharpening and output sharpening. The gist of a sharpening workflow is to limit the amount of sharpening we add...
If you’re looking to adjust color in your photos, mainly the hue, saturation, and/or luminance, the HSL panel in Lightroom will be your go-to. The HSL Panel in Lightroom allows you to adjust the hue, saturation, and luminance of eight specific colors individually. As seen in the photos below, the HSL and Color panels are located just below the Tone...
The Tone Curve panel (as shown in the photo below) is yet another incredibly intuitive tool within the Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Develop module. As I alluded to when discussing the Contrast slider in a previous blog post about the Tone Sliders, I use the Tone Curve panel to add contrast to my images instead of using the Contrast slider in...
To make images "pop," photographers often increase saturation levels. Vivid colors make photographs stand out, but it’s important to know how far is too far when it comes to saturating photos. In Lightroom, a few sliders, known as the Presence sliders, allow us to add saturation and "pop," for lack of a better word, to our images. In my previous...
Whenever a photographer talks about "toning an image," they are talking about using sliders to brighten or darken certain areas of the image. These sliders allow us to adjust the tones in the image, meaning we can adjust the brightness or darkness of different areas of the image. These sliders can be found in the Tone section of the Basic...
When working up an image in the Lightroom Develop module (or in any raw processing software), the white balance settings are a critical part of the puzzle. If you want your images to look neutral, i.e. without a color cast, then you have to nail down the white balance and it has to be extremely accurate. I would guess that...
The Develop module is the heart of Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. It is where all the magic happens. It is also the most complex module in Lightroom. As such, before we dive into the Develop module and discuss some of the critical adjustments in depth, I wanted to recap what we have already covered and give an overview of the Develop...
The histogram is one of the most important tools we have on our digital cameras and in our processing software. A histogram is a bar graph of the intensity of the light absorbed by the sensor in a digital image file. Like any bar graph, it can be read both vertically and horizontally. The horizontal axis spans the range of...